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Beating the Drum

October 9, 2009

When it comes to letting the world know about your latest creation, your options really depend on who you are – or more precisely, how deep your pockets are.

Mr P has so far done a sterling job of press releases and AI sheets (“advance information” sheets, apparently, the lifeblood of the book trade) plus setting up a blog and apparently twittering to the world – but we can up his medication to deal with that last one. Either way, results are paying off, and I can chalk up two unsolicited requests for review copies, a good mention in Britishtheatre.info’s weekly website newsletter and (hopefully) a bit of a mention in December’s Readers’ Digest Magazine.

And then there is what you do if you are a multi-millionaire theatrical composer. Step forward Mr Lloyd Webber. As some theatrically aware folk who haven’t been practicing troglodytism since yesterday may know, he has a £5 million pound show to sell…  

I was lucky enough to be one of those present to catch the press presentation of “Love Never Dies” – the long awaited sequel to “Phantom Of The Opera.” If you must launch, then do it this way – and get it filmed for the internet (whatsonstage.com has all but one bit online now). A full pit orchestra playing under two specially edited films, a private solo performance of a major new number – the bit that is a video in the online record – and a really decent joke (yes, Mr LW is actually a genial and amusing host) then onward to drinks at a 5 star hotel opposite.

Super juice and nibbles (champagne at 10.30am just doesn’t work for me personally alas – well, that’s what I tell the clinic). Oh, and a really (REALLY) nifty goody bag at the end. Sure beats a photocopied flyer, and no wonder he’s sold £2m worth of seats in under a day.

The point, though (coming over all Carrie Bradshaw) is that it was done with real heart. And that is the nub. If you believe in what you are telling people, and that belief is honest, you’ll capture and hold their attention whatever happens. And that’s the beat any drum must sound, if it is to be heard, I think.

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